wormed
affected with woodworm

Thus, sitting where I was, I lit my candle once more, and then clambered across that great coffin which, for two hours or more, had been a mid-wall of partition between me and danger. But to get out of the niche was harder than to get in; for now that I had a candle to light me, I saw that the coffin, though sound enough to outer view, was wormed through and through, and little better than a rotten shell. So it was that I had some ado to get over it, not daring either to kneel upon it or to bring much weight to bear with my hand, lest it should go through.


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  • Wormed — Datos generales Origen Madrid  España Información artística …   Wikipedia Español

  • Wormed — Wormed, a. Penetrated by worms; injured by worms; worm eaten; as, wormed timber. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wormed — adjective Bored through or damaged by worms • • • Main Entry: ↑worm …   Useful english dictionary

  • Wormed — Worm Worm, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Wormed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Worming}.] To work slowly, gradually, and secretly. [1913 Webster] When debates and fretting jealousy Did worm and work within you more and more, Your color faded. Herbert. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wormed — wÉœrm /wɜːm n. type of legless invertebrate; servile person, weasel ; screwing; computer virus which usually copies itself through a network and wastes resources or causes damage (Computers) v. creep, crawl (like a worm); squeeze cunningly;… …   English contemporary dictionary

  • wormed — deworm …   Anagrams dictionary

  • deworm — wormed …   Anagrams dictionary

  • To worm one's self into — Worm Worm, v. t. 1. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out. [1913 Webster] They find themselves wormed out of all power. Swift. [1913 Webster] They . . . wormed things out of me that I had no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Worm — Worm, v. t. 1. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out. [1913 Webster] They find themselves wormed out of all power. Swift. [1913 Webster] They . . . wormed things out of me that I had no… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • worm — [[t]wɜ͟ː(r)m[/t]] worms, worming, wormed 1) N COUNT A worm is a small animal with a long thin body, no bones and no legs. 2) N PLURAL If animals or people have worms, worms are living in their intestines. 3) VERB If you worm an animal, you give… …   English dictionary

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